Parallel Sessions

To complement the keynote addresses, the WLA in conjunction with host Lottomatica has organized nine parallel sessions, organized as three parallel tracks. The parallel sessions aim to address pressing issues of the day, from how to stay relevant in the rapidly changing world of social media through to whether sports betting is more profitable in a monopoly or competitive environment.

As a rule, the parallel sessions are organized as follows. Each session will be moderated by a lottery industry expert and will feature two to four speakers. Speakers will have approximately 15 minutes each to talk, possibly leaving time for a subsequent interactive question and answer session. Parallel sessions located in the Salone dei Cavalieri will have simultaneous interpretation available in English, Spanish, French, and German. All other parallels will be held exclusively in English.

Parallel 1

“The Internet: The future for lotteries”


Monday, November 3
14:30 – 15:30
Room Salone dei Cavalieri

The Internet offers countless opportunities for business growth. However, this medium is anything but static. As it evolves, so also must businesses develop strategies to embrace this technology and be flexible enough to adapt quickly to its pace of change. At the same time, however, the new technology also offers opportunities for unauthorized and illegal operators.

In the first presentation of this session, Sweden’s Svenska Spel will explain about its online strategy and how it benefits from new opportunities in responsible gaming. Sweden is a global forerunner in embracing the new online technology.

The second presentation in this session will provide an overview of different jurisdictions’ use of blacklists and other means of preventing illegal operators from gaining market access.

Parallel 2

“Staying relevant in the world of social media”


Monday, November 3
14:30 – 15:30
Room Sala Elisse

Social media is big and getting bigger, providing marketers with a combination of reach, relationships, and relevance. Social media's strength is in the personal connections it enables, the peer-to-peer contact it offers, all of which provides reasons for consumers to visit regularly and to stay for extended periods of time. Marketers are designing their social media strategies to maximize the effectiveness of this new medium and are developing social advertising that heightens relevance and engagement through the use of profile data within the ad units themselves. The purpose of this session is to spotlight best global lottery practices using examples from three different continents that illustrate, inform, and facilitate greater adoption of the medium.

Parallel 3

“Regulating authorities: Towards global convergence or not?”


Monday, November 3
14:30 – 15:30
Room Terrazza Monte Mario

To address market challenges while sustaining and growing their day-to-day operations, lotteries must interact with many organizations in both the public and private sectors—not least with the governing bodies and licensing agencies that regulate and monitor their operations. Complex issues also confront gaming regulators, such as: How to monitor and safeguard enterprises that provide gaming tax revenues, while also preserving the integrity of the gaming environment and the reputation of all parties involved?

Panelists from four countries will highlight the most urgent and hot regulatory topics of their regions and participate in a dialogue with participants on the question of: Towards global convergence of regulation or not?

Parallel 4

“The Lottery in your pocket: Apps for smartphones and tablets”


Monday, November 3
16:00 – 17:00
Room Salone dei Cavalieri

With smartphone and tablet technology racing ahead at breakneck speed, and younger generations expecting providers to keep pace with progress, there is no alternative to staying on top of the game if a lottery is to succeed. Should you be developing new apps for your lottery or should you be concentrating your efforts on developing the best possible design for your website? Who has developed the best game formats for the next generation of players? How should you best align your games across channels? What’s hot in mobile development, and how have suppliers planned for the future development of this growing sector? These and more questions will be debated in this session.

Parallel 5

“Driving sustainable advertising”


Monday, November 3
16:00 – 17:00
Room Sala Elisse

Advertising is essential to the success of any business. However, the question arises: How do lotteries balance the need to advertise with the ever-present requirement to only promote responsible play? Further, what role do regulators play in censoring or limiting advertising? And, how do these regulations differ from one jurisdiction to another? Also, do WLA members follow national and/or regional codes with respect to ethical considerations for responsible advertising? This session will examine all of these questions and the challenges they present, with a view to establishing ways and means to develop advertising policies for the lottery industry that are sustainable well into the future.

Parallel 6

“Electronic gaming machines”


Monday, November 3
16:00 – 17:00
Room Terrazza Monte Mario

Many jurisdictions have entrusted their national lottery with the operation of Electronic Gaming Machines (EGM). This parallel session is devoted to establishing EGM features (games and stakes), venue features (sales channels, types of outlets), and community accessibility features (player profiles) with a view to exploring future strategic initiatives to develop the segment for responsible gaming.

Parallel 7

“Draw-based games: How to make them grow?”


Tuesday, November 4
16:00 – 17:00
Room Salone dei Cavalieri

As one of the traditional pillars for lotteries, big lotto games are truly mature products, which are nonetheless constantly being updated with larger jackpots at higher price points. But big lotto is just one part of the draw-based game category. The development of the business in the future should include other types of draw-based games to engage young adults, who tend to be more stimulated by “entertainment value” than by large jackpots. To this end, this session asks: Where are the greatest growth opportunities? Do they lie in creating brand extension? Increasing the frequency of draws? Using brand name power? By including higher entertainment value? Marketers from three different countries will present their strategies on this broad category of games.

Parallel 8

“Sustainability of instant tickets in an online world”


Tuesday, November 4
16:00 - 17:00
Room Sala Elisse

Since their introduction 40 years ago, scratch tickets have provided lotteries around the world with a predictable, manageable product to help drive sales growth. By some estimates, instant tickets account for approximately EUR 56 billion of total lottery sales worldwide. Players respond to game design, prize payouts, and retail display, and have proven more than willing to move up the price point ladder as long as the value proposition is there. The appeal of instant tickets has now moved beyond paper tickets and into the online realm in many jurisdictions; but still, the ubiquitous paper scratch ticket remains the bread and butter for many of the world’s lotteries. This session will attempt to identify why this segment is thriving, asking questions like: What are the parameters driving sales? What are the challenges? And not least, what is global best practice?

Parallel 9

“Do governments benefit more from a monopoly-based or a competitive-based sports betting environment?”


Tuesday, November 4
16:00 – 17:00
Room Terrazza Monte Mario

Within the past five years, many European jurisdictions have changed their sports betting legislation from exclusive lottery licenses to multi-operator licensing regimes. To understand how this impacts profitability, innovation, product offers, payout rates, and responsible gaming, this session will be conducted in an interactive, engaging debate form.

Two teams consisting of two professionals each, drawn from lottery monopolies, licensed operators, and the lottery supplier industry, will debate the question.* Each team will have twenty minutes to present their case, followed by a further ten minutes for rebuttal from each side.

*Please note that speakers and the organizations they represent may not be in agreement with the positions they defend. Speakers will simply build a case in favour of or against the question regardless of their personal opinions, or those of the organizations they work for.